Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Wellness Home
Background
Pledge for Wellness
National Wellness Week
Eight Dimensions of Wellness
Wellness Training
Partners, Champions & Collaborators
Wellness Tools
Resources
Contact Us

National Wellness
Week 2014

September 15–21

Get on the map »

Sign up to receive Wellness Updates.







Connect with SAMHSA

Stay in touch with SAMHSA and receive updates on social media!

Facebook Twitter
SAMHSA ADS Center


Last Updated: 1/30/2014

To view or print a PDF you need to download free Adobe Reader software.

Eight Dimensions of Wellness

Take the Pledge for Wellness to Learn More!

Stay informed about the Eight Dimensions of Wellness by signing the Pledge for Wellness and receiving our regular electronic update.

A Holistic Guide to Whole-Person Wellness

For people with mental health and substance use conditions, wellness is not the absence of disease, illness or stress, but the presence of purpose in life, active involvement in satisfying work and play, joyful relationships, a healthy body and living environment, and happiness.1

Wellness means overall well-being. It incorporates the mental, emotional, physical, occupational, intellectual, and spiritual aspects of a person's life. Each aspect of wellness can affect overall quality of life, so it is important to consider all aspects of health. This is especially important for people with mental health and substance use conditions because wellness directly relates to the quality and longevity of your life.

That’s why SAMHSA's Wellness Initiative encourages you to incorporate the Eight Dimensions of Wellness in your life:2

Emotional—Coping effectively with life and creating satisfying relationships

Environmental—Good health by occupying pleasant, stimulating environments that support well-being

Financial–Satisfaction with current and future financial situations

Intellectual—Recognizing creative abilities and finding ways to expand knowledge and skills

Occupational—Personal satisfaction and enrichment from one’s work

Physical—Recognizing the need for physical activity, healthy foods and sleep

Social—Developing a sense of connection, belonging, and a well-developed support system

Spiritual—Expanding our sense of purpose and meaning in life

A text description of this image is available on a separate page.

 
  1. Dunn, H.L. (1961). High-Level Wellness, Beatty Press: Arlington, VA.
  2. Adapted from Swarbrick, M. (2006). A Wellness Approach. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 29(4), 311–314.
This Web site was developed under contract with the Office of Consumer Affairs in SAMHSA’s Center for Mental Health Services. The views, opinions, and content provided
on this Web site do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of SAMHSA or HHS. The resources listed in this Web site are not all-inclusive and inclusion on this Web site
does not constitute an endorsement by SAMHSA or HHS.