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Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration


Last Updated: 6/22/2012

SAMHSA’s Resource Center to Promote Acceptance,
Dignity and Social Inclusion Associated with
Mental Health (ADS Center)

 

Books, Articles and Research

Conceptual framework for personal recovery in mental health: systematic review and narrative synthesis
This article describes a systematic review of published descriptions and models of personal recovery that researchers conducted to create a synthesized conceptual framework of people's experiences of recovery. Their goal was to increase understanding of common elements of recovery to be used in recovery-oriented research and practice. They used 97 papers to create this framework, which, according to the article abstract, includes "(a) 13 characteristics of the recovery journey; (b) five recovery processes comprising: connectedness; hope and optimism about the future; identity; meaning in life; and empowerment (giving the acronym CHIME); and (c) recovery stage descriptions which mapped onto the transtheoretical model of change." Additionally, researchers found that studies focused on certain ethnicities were more likely to show a greater emphasis on spirituality and discrimination, along with other culturally specific aspects of recovery.

Recovery Movement Endorsed by United Nations
This White House Blog post announces that a United Nations (UN) resolution, Supporting Recovery from Substance Use Disorders, was approved by the UN's Commission on Narcotic Drugs on March 21, 2014. This landmark resolution makes recovery a top priority by recognizing that substance use disorders should be treated like other chronic health conditions and that recovery support initiatives are vital to helping prevent relapse and facilitate long-term recovery for individuals. The resolution also makes an appeal for nations to be accepting, supportive, and inclusive of people in recovery and promotes the exchange of information on best practices and evidence-based support initiatives.

Consumer and Family Psychoeducation: Assessing the Evidence
This literature review sought to examine the body of research assessing the impact of individual, group, and family psychoeducation models on various aspects of recovery including treatment adherence, relapse, and hospitalization rates. There was significant evidence to demonstrate that psychoeducation models, which are based on providing information regarding mental health and recovery to consumers, were effective in helping to promote positive recovery outcomes. The authors reviewed several studies that focused on multifamily psychoeducation groups, which they found to be linked to positive outcomes including greater problem-solving ability and lessened burden on families. The authors used these studies to make the case for psychoeducation services to be covered by insurance.

Changing Knowledge and Attitudes with a Middle School Mental Health Education Curriculum
This study sought to examine the effectiveness of the Breaking the Silence: Teaching the Next Generation About Mental Illness curriculum, which was created to help increase youth's understanding and acceptance of people with mental health issues. Because many social attitudes are formed in the early years of life and rates of children diagnosed with mental health issues have risen, it is vital now more than ever that teachers, families, providers, and communities at large ensure that attitudes towards these issues are positive and recovery-oriented as opposed to negative and discriminatory. Researchers found that utilizing this curriculum with middle school students improved their knowledge of signs of and treatment for mental health issues, their attitudes toward these issues, and their overall willingness to interact with a person with a mental health issue.

The Process of Recovery of People with Mental Illness: The Perspectives of Patients, Family Members and Care Providers; Part 1
This qualitative design study, part of a larger study on recovery, sought to examine common themes within the process of recovery from the viewpoints of people with mental health challenges, their family members and friends, and their care providers. Two significant themes emerged in the analysis. They emphasized the importance of looking to the specific story of the individual and of addressing relationship issues in the recovery process. The findings suggest that recovery relies upon bringing meaning to people's particular experiences with their mental health problems and basing their recovery processes around their unique circumstances.

Person Centered Recovery Planning Implementation
This Web page introduces the Person Centered Recovery Planning implementation project, as well as the philosophy behind it and the shift in mental health care practice required to implement it. This program allows individuals to decide the course of their treatment, empowering and encouraging them to take control of their own health and wellness. The implementation project is currently in its pilot stage and expanding to new locations in Texas. Links to a forum with additional tools and resources used in this program are available via this Web page.

Prevention is Primary: Strategies for Community Wellbeing, Second Edition
The Prevention Institute's Prevention is Primary: Strategies for Community Wellbeing text presents effective methods and tools for preventing mental health and substance use problems, as well as other health problems, and improving the health of communities. It serves as a resource for health care providers and educators, as well as community-based organizations. This text discusses various social issues and also addresses mental health needs of returning veterans.

Entry on mental illness is added to AP Stylebook
This press release announces that, as of March 7, 2013, the Associated Press (AP) had added an entry on mental illness to the AP Stylebook to help address how journalists handle questions of mental illness in their coverage. This addition is a significant positive step for public education efforts around mental health that will help reduce negative perceptions and promote social inclusion of people with mental health problems.

Social inclusion: Its importance to mental health
This Mental Health Coordinating Council document outlines the importance of social inclusion for people with mental disorders and the role that community-based organizations can play in establishing a socially inclusive community. In addition to emphasizing the importance of a meaningful community connection, this publication also focuses on the need for supportive family and caregivers, strong consumer networks, and access to clinical services as a way of reaching social inclusion.

Barriers and facilitators to mental health help-seeking for young elite athletes: a qualitative study
Oftentimes, adolescents and young adults do not seek help with mental disorders. Research has found many barriers and facilitators to getting help for young adults. In this study, researchers worked to identify specific factors that impact help-seeking among elite athletes. They found that negative and harmful attitudes and beliefs related to mental disorders were key in deterring youth from seeking support, as were negative past experiences of help-seeking. Positive feedback from and attitudes of others, including coaches, and positive encounters with providers were identified as important ways of getting young adults to seek mental health support.

Prevention, treatment, and recovery supports for those with substance use problems: Opportunities for enhanced access and quality of care
While recognizing the negative impact that substance use disorders can have on an individual, one's family, and community, this article explores ways to improve access to prevention and care for substance use disorders.

The mental health recovery movement and family therapy, part I: Consumer-led reform of services to persons diagnosed with severe mental illness
This article outlines key concepts of mental health recovery for marriage and family therapists. It provides a history and practical means of implementing a recovery-oriented approach with clients. The introduction of this approach comes as a result of a 2004 consensus statement from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that called for public mental health organizations to incorporate a recovery approach to their work with individuals with mental and substance use disorders.

Adaptation guidelines for serving Latino children and families affected by trauma
The adaptation guidelines discussed in this publication highlight key factors that should be addressed when adapting mental health practices to be used in working with Latino/Hispanic individuals impacted by trauma. Focus groups composed of experts in various fields including child trauma research, clinical practice, and cultural diversity discussed a number of important areas to consider while supporting Latino/Hispanic children and families. Some of the key areas identified are cultural values, immigration, child welfare, communication and linguistic competence, and diversity among Latinos.

Former Celtics player discusses his struggle with addiction in new book
Chris Herren, a former National Basketball Association (NBA) player, began his recovery journey to address a substance use disorder years ago. In his book, Basketball Junkie: A Memoir, he tells how he came close to losing everything, including his loved ones, and how he has regained control of his life.

The price of being strong: Risks to the mental health of athletes
This article explores how susceptible athletes are to psychological strain as they endure great pressure during competitions and throughout their careers. The prevalence of chronic trauma and traumatic brain injury in athletes is also discussed, as depression, suicide ideation, and loss of focus are common symptoms associated with these types of trauma. The likelihood of facing some forms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as athletic careers come to a close for some is also explored, as PTSD has the potential to trigger depression or feelings of grief in retiring athletes. As a means of countering many of these risks, the author emphasizes the need for people to change the negative and harmful attitudes, assumptions, and beliefs held about mental disorders and embrace the idea of help as available and attainable. The support roles of family, friends, coaches, and teammates in identifying symptoms and encouraging athletes to seek help are also highlighted.

Integration of mental health, substance use, and primary care services: Embracing our values from a client and family member perspective
The focus of this paper is to provide perspectives of clients and family members about the integration of treatment of mental and substance use disorders within primary care settings. This paper discusses core values such as wellness-focused and person-centered treatment, the importance of involving persons with lived experience and family members in local planning efforts, and recommendations for stakeholders and for self-advocacy/self-management support. It also provides information, resources, and tools to support wellness, recovery, and hope.

Models for developing trauma-informed behavioral health systems and trauma-specific services
This report explores some history of trauma-informed services in State mental health systems, describes guidelines for establishing a trauma-informed mental health service system, and also describes the variety of trauma-informed service models and approaches for State systems and providers. It includes a broad range of models including trauma-informed models for parenting, for working with child abuse survivors, and for developing trauma-informed service systems and organizations.

Risking Connection in Faith Communites: A Training Curriculum for Faith Leaders Supporting Trauma
This training guide is a resource for faith leaders assisting trauma survivors who are members of their congregations. The guide discusses the nature of psychological trauma and how it impacts individuals, including the impact of trauma on one's spirituality. The guide enhances faith leaders' understanding and skills and provides information they can use to help survivors.

Leading Change: A Plan for SAMHSA's Roles and Actions 2011-2014
This publication describes SAMHSA's plans for 2011 through 2014 to help people with behavioral health problems and their families. Their main focus is to help in developing strong communities, prevent behavioral health problems, and promote better health for all Americans. This plan is outlined by the eight new Strategic Initiatives that will guide SAMHSA's work, each Initiative with its own purpose, specific goal, action step, and measure for determining success.

Successfully exiting homelessness: Experiences of formerly homeless mentally ill individuals
This study sought to identify and describe the processes of change which contribute to homeless individuals obtaining and maintaining stable housing. The researchers examined the impact of a number of factors including employment difficulties, behavioral health problems, and relationships with family, friends, and service providers. A key finding was that relationships with family, friends and service providers were central to achieving stable housing.

Child wellness and social inclusion: Values for action
This article discusses various approaches to promoting inclusion of youth through Participatory Action Research (PAR). Recognizing the immense contributions that inclusion has on wellness, researchers address specific values of social inclusion on child wellness and the action needed to implement these values.

A common purpose: Recovery in future mental health services
This paper seeks to define recovery and discuss what recovery means for the development of future behavioral health services. It addresses ways the recovery approach can be beneficial for individuals' overall health and for social care services, i.e. services which address needs associated with the health and welfare of the population. The paper encourages mental health professionals, consumers, and friends and family of consumers to work toward enhancing current standards and making recovery a key component of developing services.

Peer-run supportive housing for families
This article describes the approach of Housing Options Made Easy, (HOME) Inc., a consumer-run supportive housing program. The article discusses the service approach HOME's peer providers use to support residents in achieving personal recovery and the positive outcomes experienced by residents including fewer and shorter hospital stays and reduced use of crisis services. The article also discusses system-level benefits realized through this program including cost savings, a reduction in negative attitudes, and improved overall effectiveness of the area's mental health delivery system.

The Role of Social Capital in Building Healthy Communities
This report focuses on the role that community-based institutions play in developing healthy communities and encouraging social capital. Information from case studies done in four U.S. cities are used to address the different views of social capital, local social service delivery systems, and influence of faith communities in providing support to families and communities.

Transforming the nation's health: Next steps in mental health promotion
In this commentary, A. Kathryn Power, Director of the SAMHSA Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, advocates for a public health approach to behavioral health promotion and behavioral disorder prevention. She discusses the relationship of behavioral health to overall health and presents a strategy to build resilience at the individual, family, and community levels. She also describes SAMHSA's work to attain the goals within the strategy.

Infants of depressed mothers living in poverty: Opportunities to identify and serve
Depression can affect parenting and thus the health, safety, and development of an infant under the care of a parent experiencing depression. This paper discusses ways that existing service programs for mothers living in poverty can be used to identify and provide appropriate mental health services to mothers who are depressed and caring for infants.

Poverty, social stress & mental health
This article explores the relationship between mental health problems and poverty. Specifically, the authors discuss the prevalence of mental health problems and poverty, the effect of mental health on socioeconomic status and vice versa, issues specific to women and children, and the complexities of measuring mental health and socioeconomic status.

An achievable vision: Report of the Department of Defense task force on mental health
This 2007 report of the Department of Defense Task Force on Mental Health identifies four interconnected goals that the task force deemed essential to maintaining the psychological health, enhancing the resilience, and ensuring the recovery of service members and their families, all of which are essential to maintaining a ready and fully capable military force. The report provided detailed recommendations for necessary steps to achieve these goals.

Q&A: First lady Rosalynn Carter on America's mental health crisis
TIME interviewed Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, advocate for improving the mental health system and ending the negative perceptions that keep many people from getting proper care. In the interview, Mrs. Carter comments on topics including psychiatric drugs for children and the needs of returning service members.

Within our reach: Ending the mental health crisis
This book, written by former first lady Rosalynn Carter with Susan Golant and Kathryn Cade, offers an assessment of the current state of mental health. The book focuses on both the progress Mrs. Carter has seen during her 35 years of advocacy and the serious issues that must still be addressed before the mental health system can adequately meet the needs of people with mental health problems.

Family network support and mental health recovery
This study sought to determine which aspects of the family support network are perceived by mental health consumers/survivors as most important to their recovery process. Study findings revealed that support and reciprocity among family members are important dimensions of a personal support network that aids in the recovery process.

IAVA and Ad Council launch historic campaign
This press release announces the launch of a historic public service announcement (PSA) campaign. Through a partnership of IAVA and the Ad Council, this groundbreaking, multiyear effort seeks to ease the readjustment for service members returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan. The PSAs direct viewers to the first and only online community exclusive to Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, www.CommunityofVeterans.org. The social networking site offers a unique platform for veterans to connect with one another confidentially and serves as a portal for comprehensive mental health resources.

The Importance of Community Development For Health and Well-Being
This report examines the key role that environmental and community forces play in promoting health and preventing disease. In addition, the authors assert that social and public works programs will be more successful if people living in impacted neighborhoods are afforded the opportunity to participate in the creation and management of the initiatives that affect them.

Evaluation of a middle school mental health education program: Executive summary
Wahl details his findings that the "Breaking the Silence" curriculum may help prevent the formation of negative attitudes and foster more accurate understanding and acceptance of people with psychiatric disorders among middle school aged children.

Vision and Progress: Social Inclusion and Mental Health
This report examines the progress of the National Social Inclusion Programme as it works to implement the activities outlined by the 2004 Mental Health and Social Exclusion Report. Details are given on the progress made so far and on the work still to be done.

Mental Health and Social Exclusion: Social Exclusion Unit Report
This report examines the impact mental health problems have on increasing social exclusion. The report also developed a 27-point action plan to address this problem.

Attitudes toward mental health services: age-group differences in Korean American adults
The present study examined the attitudes toward mental health services held by younger and older groups of Korean Americans. The findings provide important implications for interventions targeted to improve access to mental health care among minority populations. Based on the similarities and differences found between young and old, both general and age-specific strategies need to be developed in order to increase effectiveness of these programs.

An emotive subject: Insights from social, voluntary and healthcare professionals into the feelings of family carers for people with mental health problems.
This paper explores the emotions of family carers from the perspectives of social, voluntary and healthcare professionals. Sixty-five participants were interviewed, the sample included directors, managers and senior staff from social, voluntary and healthcare organisations.

Striving to help college students with mental health issues
In this article, the author suggests that the mental health problems in the college population appear to be increasing in number and severity. In addition, it is believed that many students do not actually seek much-needed counseling services due to lack of knowledge about mental health problems or services, fear of prejudice, or denial of the severity of the problem.

Campus mental health: Know your rights
Campus Mental Health: Know Your Rights is a guide for college and university students to the legal rights one has when seeking mental health services. It also explains what can be expected in interactions with mental health service providers and what obligations one might have.

Rural and frontier mental and behavioral health care: Barriers, effective policy strategies, best practices
This report focuses on the following areas: barriers to mental and behavioral health service delivery in rural America, model programs and effective activities for rural America, model policy strategies for rural mental and behavioral health care delivery, the role telehealth should play in service delivery to rural America, and the role that State Offices of Rural Health and other State and local organizations should play in service delivery to rural America.

A survey of preferred terms for users of mental health services.
This survey was conducted to determine how users of mental health services would like to be addressed by professionals. Three hundred two persons participating in a variety of inpatient and outpatient psychiatric programs were surveyed.

Demystifying Mental Illness in Any Language
This article explores the challenges of bringing mental health care to some immigrant communities. , Challenges include not only language barriers, but also negative attitudes and misconceptions about mental health issues and seeking treatment for these issues specific to particular communities. This article looks at providing mental health care across cultures by building trust in communities and normalizing the experience of treatment.

From Brother's Death, a Crusade
The death of her only brother, and the discovery that he had hidden his struggles with mental illness from his friends and family for years after he began hearing voices, rocked Ms. Malmon's world, and by her junior year led her to start the student group that evolved into Active Minds Inc., a nonprofit organization with student-run chapters on 65 campuses, devoted to increasing awareness of mental illness.

Evaluating the effectiveness of a consumer-provided mental health recovery education presentation
The current study investigated the effectiveness of the In Our Own Voice (IOOV) mental health education program in improving knowledge and attitudes about mental illnesses.  

Social network's healing power is borne out in poorer nations
This article describes the findings of a 3-decade-long study by the World Health Organization (WHO) which found that mental health consumers in poorer countries have higher rates of recovering from schizophrenia. Key findings described explore the role that family support, culture, and other social networks have on individuals with schizophrenia. This article discusses the differences in the roles of doctors, the invaluable role of families, and the importance of integrating social and cultural supports with medicine to achieve more positive outcomes.

A family's painful journey
This article discusses the issues faced in Maryland in seeking assistance for children with severe mental illness. It focuses on State budget cuts for wraparound mental health coverage. 

New York City Voices
New York City Voices includes articles on many mental health topics, such as recovery from mental health and substance use challenges, support resources, wellness practices, and public policy. Authors include mental health consumers, ex-patients /survivors, family members, and mental health and substance use treatment providers. Currently in blog format, the publication was previously at a different Web site; archived issues are now available at this Web site: http://willslist.org/newyorkcityvoices_archive.

Report of the Surgeon General's Conference on Children's Mental Health: A National Action Agenda
This Web page presents a report on the Surgeon General’s National Action Agenda on Children’s Mental Health. The agenda was developed in two U.S. Government meetings, both in 2000, one attended by more than 300 stakeholders in the area of mental health, including mental healthcare providers, scientists, and advocacy groups. The agenda encompasses eight goals, the first of which involves increasing awareness of children’s mental health issues and reducing biases, inaccurate perceptions, and exclusion associated with mental health problems.

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This Web site was developed under contract with the Office of Consumer Affairs in SAMHSA’s Center for Mental Health Services. The views, opinions, and content provided on this Web site do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of SAMHSA or HHS. The resources listed in this Web site are not all-inclusive and inclusion on this Web site does not constitute an endorsement by SAMHSA or HHS.